Browsing All posts tagged under »disagreement«

Norms of advocacy

October 16, 2013

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In  Virtues of Argumentation. Proceedings of the 10th International Conference of the Ontario Society for the Study of Argumentation (OSSA), 22-26 May 2013, edited by D. Mohammed & M. Lewiński. Windsor, ON: OSSA, 2013. This essay advances an account of the ordinary speech activity of advocating. The ethical principles developed within advocacy professions such as law […]

Lippmann, the indispensable opposition

July 14, 2012

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Lippmann's thoroughgoing pessimism may lead us to a better understanding of the role of communication in public deliberations between scientists and citizens.

Theoretical pieties, Johnstone’s impiety, and ordinary views of argumentation

July 14, 2012

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We teachers of argument have nothing to apologize for.

Argument has no function

July 14, 2012

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Argument has no determinable function in the sense Walton needs, and even if it did, that function would not ground norms for argumentative practice.

What, in practice, is an argument?

July 14, 2012

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In this paper, I try to reach past our theories and capture a conception of argument held by practitioners.

What does arguing look like?

July 13, 2012

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At first glance, arguing does look angry and futile. But on second view, it's more complicated.

Students’ perspectives on debate exercises in content area classes

July 13, 2012

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A report on students' attitudes towards debates used primarily to promote learning of a subject.

The noncooperative pragmatics of arguing

July 13, 2012

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As seen in the OJ Simpson criminal trial, arguing can be both noncooperative and normatively good.

Johnstone’s still-unacknowledged contributions to contemporary argumentation theory

July 13, 2012

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Given the pragmatic turn recently taken by argumentation studies, we owe renewed attention to Henry Johnstone's views on the primacy of process over product.

Good argumentation without resolution

July 13, 2012

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A case study of the debate over US entry into the first Gulf War shows that there can be good argumentation that does not aim at resolution.

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