Browsing All posts tagged under »case studies«

Institutions for argument: Cultivating the formation of collective intent

July 13, 2012

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Argumentation, while it seldom resolves issues, does create conditions under which collective intentions can more securely be ascribed.

Designing premises

July 13, 2012

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But how do people who disagree--often deeply--manage to locate the shared premises they need in order to have an argument?

Designing issues

July 13, 2012

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"Issue" is a central regulatory concept within argumentative practice; the issues are what we argue about. In this paper, I develop a theory of issues, and in particular, the practical means arguers have for forcing others to attend to their issues.

The noncooperative pragmatics of arguing

July 13, 2012

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As seen in the OJ Simpson criminal trial, arguing can be both noncooperative and normatively good.

Cicero’s authority

July 13, 2012

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I give an account of the force of the appeal to authority, based on the sophisticated rhetorical practice of ancient Rome's greatest orator, Cicero.

Three faces of the future

July 13, 2012

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The long future lacks appeal, so rhetors in practice give it a face.

Good argumentation without resolution

July 13, 2012

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A case study of the debate over US entry into the first Gulf War shows that there can be good argumentation that does not aim at resolution.

Deliberation and character

July 13, 2012

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I sketch the contours of the rhetorical appeal to dignity, which calls on citizens to live up to who they are.

Pereman, adhering and conviction

July 13, 2012

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Cite: Goodwin, Jean. “Perelman, Adhering and Convictions.” Philosophy & Rhetoric 28 (1995): 215-33. Abstract: Perelman’s theory of argumentation is based on a one-dimensional psychology of adherence: people stick to propositions, with various degrees of strength. This is inadequate to account for the rhetorical force of the convictions people commit themselves to–which become an aspect of their […]