Browsing All posts tagged under »normative pragmatic approach«

Accounting for the appeal to the authority of experts

July 14, 2012

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Experts have methods for earning the trust of lay audiences--but using their authority is costly. I explain how.

Theoretical pieties, Johnstone’s impiety, and ordinary views of argumentation

July 14, 2012

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We teachers of argument have nothing to apologize for.

Argument has no function

July 14, 2012

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Argument has no determinable function in the sense Walton needs, and even if it did, that function would not ground norms for argumentative practice.

Institutions for argument: Cultivating the formation of collective intent

July 13, 2012

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Argumentation, while it seldom resolves issues, does create conditions under which collective intentions can more securely be ascribed.

Designing premises

July 13, 2012

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But how do people who disagree--often deeply--manage to locate the shared premises they need in order to have an argument?

Manifestly adequate premises

July 13, 2012

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What practical means do arguers who have little motivation to cooperate with each other nevertheless manage to force each other to make some propositions the unchallenged starting points or premises of arguments?

Designing issues

July 13, 2012

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"Issue" is a central regulatory concept within argumentative practice; the issues are what we argue about. In this paper, I develop a theory of issues, and in particular, the practical means arguers have for forcing others to attend to their issues.

One question, two answers

July 13, 2012

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I lay out the basics of "design theory"--a/k/a the normative pragmatics of arguing, particularly in contrast to other approaches.

The noncooperative pragmatics of arguing

July 13, 2012

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As seen in the OJ Simpson criminal trial, arguing can be both noncooperative and normatively good.

Cicero’s authority

July 13, 2012

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I give an account of the force of the appeal to authority, based on the sophisticated rhetorical practice of ancient Rome's greatest orator, Cicero.